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Dramatic warnings on sea-level rise

This week’s climate conference in Copenhagen will sound an alarm over new floodings – enough to devastate low-lying areas such as Bangladesh, Florida and the Thames estuary, writes Robin McKie.

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Scientists will warn this week that rising sea levels, triggered by global warming, pose a far greater danger to the planet than previously estimated. There is now a major risk that many coastal areas around the world will be inundated by the end of the century because Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets are melting faster than previously estimated.

Low-lying areas including Bangladesh, Florida, the Maldives and the Netherlands face catastrophic flooding, while, in Britain, large areas of the Norfolk Broads [in eastern England] and the Thames estuary are likely to disappear by 2100. In addition, cities including London, Hull and Portsmouth will need new flood defences.

“It is now clear that there are going to be massive flooding disasters around the globe,” said Dr David Vaughan, of the British Antarctic Survey. “Populations are shifting to the coast, which means that more and more people are going to be threatened by sea-level rises.”

The issue is set to dominate the opening sessions of the international climate change conference in Copenhagen this week, when scientists will outline their latest findings on a host of issues concerning global warming. The meeting has been organised to set the agenda for COP15, this December’s international climate talks (also to be held in Copenhagen), which will draw up a treaty to replace the current Kyoto protocol for limiting carbon-dioxide (CO2) emissions.

And key to these deliberations will be the issue of ice-sheet melting. The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) -- when it presented its most up-to-date report on the likely impact of global warming in 2007 -- concluded that sea-level rises of between 20 and 60 centimetres would occur by 2100. These figures were derived from estimates of how much the sea will increase in volume as it heats up, a process called thermal expansion, and from projected increases in run-off water from melting glaciers in the Himalayas and other mountain ranges.

But the report contained an important caveat: that its sea-level rise estimate contained very little input from melting ice sheets in Antarctica and Greenland. The IPCC forecast, therefore, tended to underestimate forthcoming changes.

“The IPCC felt the whole dynamics of polar ice-sheet melting were too poorly understood,” added Vaughan. “However, we are now getting a much better idea of what is going on in Greenland and Antarctica and can make much more accurate forecasts about ice-sheet melting and its contribution to sea-level rises.”

From studying satellite images, scientists have watched the sea ice that hugs the Greenland and Antarctic shores dwindle and disappear. Sea-ice melting on its own does not cause ocean levels to rise, but its disappearance has a major impact on land ice sheets. Without sea ice to prop them up, the land sheets tip into the water and disintegrate at increasing rates, a phenomenon that is now being studied in detail by researchers.

“It is becoming increasingly apparent from our studies of Greenland and Antarctica that changes to sea ice are being transmitted into the hearts of the land-ice sheets in a remarkably short time,” added Vaughan. As a result, those land sheets are breaking up faster and far more melt water is being added to the oceans than was previously expected.

These revisions suggest sea-level rises could easily top one metre by 2100 -- a figure that is backed by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), which this year warned that they could reach as much as 1.5 metres.

In addition, in September, a team led by Dr Tad Pfeffer at the University of Colorado at Boulder published calculations using conservative, medium and extreme glaciological assumptions for sea-level rise expected from Greenland, Antarctica and the world’s smaller glaciers and ice caps. They concluded that the most plausible scenario, when factoring in thermal expansion due to warming waters, will lead to a total sea-level rise of one to two metres by 2100.

Similarly, a commission of 20 international experts, called on by the Dutch government to help plan its coastal defences, recently gave a range of 55 centimetres to 1.1 metres for sea-level rises by 2100. “Equally important, this commission has highlighted the fact that sea-level rise will not stop in the year 2100,” said Professor Stefan Rahmstorf of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research. “By 2200, they estimate a rise of 1.5- to 3.5-metre unless we stop the warming. This would spell the end of many of our coastal cities.”

This point was backed by Dr Jason Lowe of the Hadley Centre, the United Kingdom’s foremost climate-change research centre. “It is still not clear exactly how much the sea will rise by the end of this century, but it is certain that rises will continue for hundreds of years beyond that -- even if we do manage to stabilise carbon-dioxide emissions and halt the rise in atmospheric temperature,” he said. “The sea will continue to heat up and expand. In addition, the Greenland ice sheets will continue to melt.”

This latter effect could, ultimately, have a particularly destructive impact. Scientists have calculated that if industrial emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases eventually produce a global temperature increase of around 4° Celsius, there is a risk that Greenland’s ice covering could melt completely. This could take several hundred years or it might require a couple of thousand. The end result is not in doubt, however. It would add around seven metres to the planet’s sea levels. The consequence would be utter devastation.

Such a scenario is distant, but real, scientists insist. However, at present, the most important issue, they argue, is that of short-term sea-level rises: probably around one metre by 2100. When that occurs, the Maldives will be submerged, along with islands like the Sunderbans in the Bay of Bengal, and Kiribati and Tuvalu in the Pacific. The United States -- which has roughly 20,000 kilometres of coastline and more than 50,000 square kilometres of coastal wetlands -- would face a bill of around US$156 billion to protect this land. Cities such as London would require massive investments to provide defences against the rising waters. Others, such as Alexandria, in Egypt, would simply be inundated.

Rising oceans also will contaminate both surface and underground fresh water supplies, worsening the world’s existing fresh-water shortage. Underground water sources in Thailand, Israel, China and Vietnam already are experiencing salt-water contamination.

Coastal farmland will be wiped out, triggering massive displacements of men, women and children. It is estimated that a one-metre sea-level rise could flood 17% of Bangladesh, one of the world’s poorest countries, reducing its rice-farming land by 50% and leaving tens of millions without homes.

Such destruction would not be caused merely by rising sea levels, however. Other effects of global warming also will worsen the mayhem that lies ahead: in particular, the increase in major storms. “When we talk about the dangers of future sea-level rises, we are not talking about a problem akin to pouring water into a bath,” added Colin Brown, director of engineering at Britain’s Institution of Mechanical Engineers. “Climate-change research shows there will be significant increases in storms as global temperatures rise. These will produce more intense gales and hurricanes and these, in turn, will produce massive storm surges as they pass over the sea.”

The result will be the appearance of the super-surge, a climatic double whammy that will savage low-lying regions that include Britain’s south-eastern coastline, in particular East Anglia and the Thames estuary, along with cities such as London, Portsmouth and Hull, which are rated as being particularly vulnerable to sea-level rise.

In addition to these hotspots, the country will also face massive disruption to its transport and energy systems unless it acts swiftly, according to a report -- Climate Change, Adapting to the Inevitable -- published last month by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. Many rail lines run along river valleys that will be flooded with increased regularity while bridges carrying trains and trucks often cross shipping lanes and may have to be redesigned to accommodate rising water levels.

“Power supplies will also be affected,” added Brown. “The Sizewell B nuclear plant has been built on the Suffolk coast, a site that has been earmarked for the construction of several more nuclear plants. However, Sizewell will certainly be affected by rising sea levels. Engineers say they can build concrete walls that will keep out the water throughout the working lives of these new plants. But that is not enough. Nuclear plants may operate for 50 years, but it could take hundreds of years to decommission them. By that time, who knows what sea-level rises and what kinds of inundations the country will be experiencing?”

Most scientists believe Britain remains relatively well placed to combat sea-level rises. “The government has been fairly far-sighted over this issue, with projects such as Thames Estuary 2100 being set up to prepare flooding defence projects,” said Professor Robert Nicholls, of the University of Southampton.

This does not stop the controversy, however. In its report, the Institution of Mechanical Engineers warned that many areas would have to be abandoned because they are simply too expensive to protect. In particular, large areas of the Norfolk coastline would be left to be inundated -- a massive loss of human habitat.

But this approach represents an abrogation of national duty to many people -- particularly those whose homes will be destroyed, individuals such as Martin George, former chairman of the Broads Society. “A country that has the technological know-how to extract oil and coal from below the North Sea should surely be capable of finding a way to protect a concrete sea wall against the effects of climate change. We should do our damnedest to safeguard our heritage,” he said.

 

Why the sea is rising

Thermal expansion. All bodies expand when they are heated, and that is true for the water that covers 70% of the planet. The oceans are expanding -- upwards.   It is estimated this increase in volume will raise levels by 10 to 40 centimetres

• Melting glaciers and mountain ice caps -- outside Greenland and Antarctica -- are also adding water to rivers that flow to the oceans. However, these remain a modest source of sea-level rise. Possibly around 10 centimetres.

• The Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets represent vast reserves of frozen fresh water. The former would add seven metres to sea levels if melted completely; the latter would bring a further 60-metre rise to the levels of the world’s oceans.

 

Additional research by Lisa Kjellsson
 

Copyright Guardian News and Media Limited 2009
 

Homepage photo by ecstaticist 

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评论 comments

Default avatar
匿名 | Anonymous

海面上升

这对于沿海地区来说是个不幸的消息,当地往往拥有便利的港口,交通方便,经济发展更活跃,但在未来很多人们将被迫迁居别处。更不用说那些大洋上的岛国,在国际社会中处于无人关注的地位,他们的未来更加艰难。

A rising sea level

This is unfortunate for coastal areas. These places often have lively harbours, and are convenient, with well-developed transport and good economic growth. People will be forced to migrate away from these places in the future. The situation will be even worse for people who live in islands far out in the ocean, in areas that people are not very concerned about -- their future will have even more hardship.
(Translated by Nichole)

Default avatar
匿名 | Anonymous

中国的哪些城市将会受到海平面上升的影响?

地图上显示的海拔仅为一到两米的中国沿海城市十分令人担忧,特别是对于那些在珠江三角洲和长江三角洲投资或生活的人来说。

Which cities in China would be affected by rising sea level?

A map showing which coastal areas of China are one or two metres above sea level would be rather worrying - particularly to those with investments and livelihoods in the Pearl River delta and Yangtse estuary.

Default avatar
匿名 | Anonymous

中国的城市

这是对评论2进行的回答。请点击以下链接,这能让你对中国的海岸,以及不同程度的海平面上升对城市和地区会带来不同的影响有个互动式的了解。http://flood.firetree.net.
在页面顶部的框架中对海平面上升程度和国家(例如:中国&日本)进行选择,然后点击。

Cities in China

In reply to comment no. 2, please, see this link for an interactive look at China's (or any country's) coast, and how different levels of sea rise may affect its cities and regions.

http://flood.firetree.net

Choose a sea-level rise and a country (e.g., "China & Japan") from the bar across the top of the page, and click.

Default avatar
匿名 | Anonymous

回应3号

看了一下地图,中国的江浙一带比较危险,似乎作为岛国的日本情况更为不妙,很多城市都将会被海水淹没。

Response to No.3

Look at a map - the belt around China's Jiangsu and Zhejiang provinces is dangerous, but as an island country, the situation of Japan is even worse. In the future many cities will be submerged by sea water.